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20/04/2017

The main exhibition of the 7th Tallinn Applied Art Triennial will be opened in the Estonian Museum of Applied Art and Design this Friday, 21 April. The opening weekend of the triennial will include guided tours at the main exhibition, but also artist talks. Prior to the opening of the main exhibition everyone is invited to take part in the seminar and extensive satellite programme.

The thematic main exhibition of the 7th Tallinn Applied Art Triennial features artists from Nordic countries, Central Europe, United Kingdom, Ireland, Spain, Israel, but also China, Taiwan, USA and Canada. Their artworks reflecting on the concept of time were chosen to the exhibition out of 256 works submitted to the open call. The exhibition includes ceramics, jewellery, glass, textile and blacksmithing, but also video and large-scale installations.

It is also possible to visit the main exhibition in the Estonian Applied Art and Design Museum (Lai 17) with a tour guide. The first guided tours will take place on Saturday, 22 April at 11.00 (in Estonian) and at 16.00 (in English) and on Sunday, 23 April (in Russian). To participate in the guided tour museum ticket is required; the duration of the tour is approximately an hour.

On Saturday, 22 April everyone is welcome to meet the artists taking part of the main exhibition. From 12.00–15.00 the artists will be giving presentations at the Loewenschede tower (Kooli 7).

In addition to the main exhibition the triennial features an extensive satellite programme. This week alone will include 10 solo and group exhibition openings, as well as sound and participatory installations, a glass art project taking place in various cafés in Tallinn, a seminar on art mediation and many other events. To get more information on the opening weekend programme, see here.

Anu Almik


06/04/2017

With the aim of improving the visibility of applied art and design, a seminar “Modes of mediating applied art and design” will take place on the day of the opening of the triennial, 21 April. Everyone interested is welcome to pre-register!

Bringing together artists, critics, curators and communications professionals and other esteemed experts, the seminar seeks an answer to the question of how to mediate applied art to a wider public, offer relevant feedback to artists and raise the overall design literacy in society.

The presenters include André Gali, a Norwegian art critic and editor (Norwegian Crafts Magazine), Sarah Gilbert, a glass artists and educator from United States, Karin Paulus, an Estonian critic and journalist, Liz Farrelly, a critic, editor, curator and educator from United Kingdom and Hanna Kapanen, a curator of educational programmes from Finland.

The registration form and more information about the seminar can be found here.

Anu Almik


20/03/2017

The full programme of the 7th Tallinn Applied Art Triennial is now made public. In addition to the main exhibition, it includes a seminar on communicating applied art, an extensive satellite programme, artists’ talks and guided tours.

The main exhibition of the triennial, titled “Ajavahe. Time Difference” opens on 21 April at the Estonian Museum of Applied Art and Design and will remain open until 23 July. The exhibition includes 49 works by artists from 19 countries. These works were chosen out of 256 open call submissions by an international jury. The selection features ceramics, jewellery, glass, textile, blacksmithing, but also video and large-scale installations.

The opening day of the triennial, 21 April will start with a seminar dedicated to discussing communication in the field of applied art, taking place in Cinema Sõprus. The registration for the seminar is now open. The audience is also welcome to join our artists’ presentations event and guided tours.

The satellite programme consists of 26 exhibitions, performances and installations that take place in galleries, cafés, open studios and other exciting locations all over Tallinn. The satellite programme launches already in the end of March and will run until the beginning of August.

The goal of the 7th Tallinn Applied Art Triennial is to contribute to the development of concept-based applied art and design and introduce it to a broader audience.

Anu Almik


21/11/2016

Out of the 256 applications submitted to the open call the jury chose 50 artists to participate in the main exhibition of the 7th Tallinn Applied Art Triennial, “Ajavahe. Time Difference” opening on 21 April, 2017. We welcomed works that related to the topics of time, tempo, different notions of and approaches to time. The open call received applications from 32 countries, the final selection includes artists from 19 countries: Estonia, Norway, the Netherlands, Germany, Finland, Sweden, the United Kingdom, Belgium, Canada, Ireland, Israel, USA, Latvia, Lithuania, Spain, China, Switzerland, Taiwan and France.

We are happy to publish the list of artists chosen by the jury:
Naama Agassi, Ulla Ahola, Monika Auch, Beverly Ayling-Smith, Sofia Björkman, Chloe Brenan, Lin Chang-Rong, Eunmi Chun, Sara Chyan, Johanna Dahm, Hilde A Danielsen, Patricia Domingues, Jurgita Erminaitė-Šimkuvienė, Sabin Garea, Ellen Grieg, Adam Grinovich, Dainis Gudovskis, Kay Guo, Anita Hanch-Hansen, Maarit Helistvee, Nils Hint, Trine Hovden, Katrin Kabun, Pille Kaleviste, Joshua Kosker, Eero Kotli, Riikka Latva-Somppi, Thérèse Lebrun, Krista Leesi, Felieke van der Leest, Jaakko Leeve, Ivo Lill, Nanna Melland, Johanne Ness and Hanne Overland, Silja Saarepuu ja Villu Plink, Lucy Sarneel, Debra Sloan , Céline Sylvestre, Aet Ollisaar, OTSE! and A5 (Nils Hint, Annika Kedelauk, Rainer Kaasik-Aaslav, Annika Pettersson, and Adam Grinovich), Yuka Oyama, Ruudt Peters, Annelies Planteijdt, Edu Tarin (in collaboration with Klein & Becker GmbH & Co), Octave Vandeweghe, Tanel Veenre, Estela Saez Vilanova, Lin Wang, Hedvig Winge, Kiyoshi Yamamoto.

Members of the jury are art critic and editor André Gali from Norway, artist and educator Sarah Gilbert from USA, philosopher, critic and lecturer Eik Hermann from Estonia, gallerist, writer, translator and lecturer Keiu Krikmann from Estonia and jewellery artist, Program Manager of Fine Arts of the Saimaa University of Applied Sciences and lecturer Eija Mustonen from Finland.

Commenting on the decision-making process, the chairman of the jury, André Gali said: “Obviously we looked for qualities like good concepts relating to the theme of «Time Difference», innovative use of materials, exciting shapes and colours, but also how the works would relate to each other as a whole. We looked for diversity, in scale, in material, in artistic approach and attitude, and we looked for works that can evoke interesting conversations between themselves and with the viewer.”

The main exhibition of the Triennial on the theme “Ajavahe. Time Difference” will take place from 21 April 2017 to 23 July 2017 at the Estonian Museum of Applied Arts and Design in Tallinn, Estonia. A Grand Prix and two equal second place prizes will be awarded. The winners will be announced at the exhibition opening on 21 April 2017. The exhibition prize fund is 5000 euros. Additionally, the programme of the triennial includes a seminar, satellite exhibitions and a day of artist presentations.

Anu Almik


25/10/2016

Open call for the main exhibition of the 7th Tallinn Applied Art Triennial was closed October 10th. 256 works/series of works were submitted altogether by 243 artists/designers from 32 countries. In the coming days an international five-member jury is going to gather in Tallinn to select the works for the main exhibition amongst the submissions.

Members of the jury are an art critic and editor André Gali from Norway, an artist and educator Sarah Gilbert from USA, a philosopher, critic and lecturer Eik Hermann from Estonia, a gallerist, writer, translator and lecturer Keiu Krikmann from Estonia and a jewellery artist and lecturer Eija Mustonen from Finland. The selection of the works is anonymous and the applicants will be notified about the jury’s decision by 21 November 2016.

Individuals and groups from all fields of applied art and design were invited to take part in the open call for the main exhibition. Works in both digital and physical form that deal with topics relating to time, tempo, different notions of time, and approaches to time were welcome.

The main exhibition of the Triennial on the theme “Ajavahe. Time Difference” will take place from 21 April 2017 to 23 July 2017 at the Estonian Museum of Applied Arts and Design in Tallinn, Estonia.

Anu Almik


07/10/2016
One of the favourite visuals of Marje and Martin

The visual identity of the 7th Tallinn Applied Art Triennial is created by Marje and Martin Eelma from the graphic design studio Tuumik. We asked them a few questions about how the triennial’s visuals were developed. And they also share a couple of their own favourites.

The visuals for the Tallinn Applied Art Triennial is really colourful and eye-catching. How did you arrive to that? Is there a story behind it? What were you inspired by?

We started off with the theme of the triennial, “Ajavahe. Time Difference”. When we got the initial brief, it featured a description of the Italian jewellery artist Giovanni Corvaja’ painstaking years long work “Golden Fleece” that seemed to defy all (contemporary) rational thinking – he is creating fur-like ritual objects of gold. The objects are made of gold wire with a diameter of 1/5 of a single stand of human hair and they feel soft as fur. This took our breath away and made us think how different the concept of time can be for people. The theme of the triennial also spoke to us, time is something we think about often. Images from our own past also started popping up: Marje studied in Tartu and had to go back and forth between Tallinn and Tartu, either by train or bus, so she always wondered about the many lit windows she passed in the complete darkness 90 km/h and the stories they could have told.

When we were creating the visual identity, we thought about the passing of time, how we perceive things differently, to what extent it is possible to go deeper when the tempo alternates – you notice bigger things when you move faster, details when you go slower. If the tempo is set for you by someone else and it is not what you are comfortable with, a certain shift occurs – you see your surroundings, but it seems different, your perception of reality is warped. Your own state of being changes how you see the world.

At first we were playing around with colourful surfaces, divided them into bigger and smaller sections, trying to convey different speeds with surfaces of different colour and size, according to the amount of information they displayed. Then we moved on to using a programme that worked in a way that you could shake, rotate or move around your tablet without even knowing what happens with the colours and shapes on the screen. The colours and shapes began shifting, the programme shook up reality and a whole other world appeared. We liked that it really related to the theme of pace, the passing of time.

Tuumik is a recognised graphic design studio, so you can surely choose your own clients. What inspired you to work with the triennial?

For us the number one concern is the people we work with, but also the project itself – is it necessary, does it have an idea behind it? It has to be consistent with our own view of the world. And the concept is also really important for us when creating the visuals. We also take on clients from outside the field of culture, although this field is particularly close to our hearts. It is important that we would find the work exciting.

We do not want to take on too many similar projects, it would not be interesting to us. We try to find projects that are new to us and we have not done art events like the triennial before. We were attracted to the fact that it is an international event. The participants seem fascinating and by working with them we can definitely get a more thorough picture than just by going to exhibitions. We love it when we get to know new things while working on something.

One of the favourite visuals of Marje and Martin

 

Anu Almik


20/09/2016

In spring 2017, the 7th Tallinn Applied Art Triennial will once again invite applied arts and design professionals and fans to Estonia. The topic of the Triennial, taking place from the 21st of April until the 23rd of July, is “Ajavahe. Time Difference”, encompassing time and the different ways of perceiving it. The curatorial team of the Triennial asks artists and designers to explore whether people really are overwhelmed by the apparent overabundance of information and how they deal with it, how they perceive time and deal with extremely fast-paced life. To allow participants more time, the deadline of the open call for artists and designers to participate in the Main Exhibition of the Triennial has been extended from September 30th to 10th October 10th, 2016.

According to Merle Kasonen, the chairwoman of the Triennial, extensive time expenditure and the meaningful use of it is definitely one of the features that binds together various fields of applied art. “The current point in time seems to be a crossroad of two world views. Fast fashion and other types of fast consumption are starting to seem outdated – at least in the eyes of the responsible persons trying to see the bigger picture – and people are looking for new paths and directions. Both slowness (falling behind) and speed (extreme superficiality) have acquired equally negative connotations. At the same time, the sense of time is subjective – and this is what we invite artists and designers to explore,” Kasonen explains.

Until October 10th, the open call for the Main Exhibition of the Triennial is open to individuals and groups from all fields of applied art and design. Works in both digital and physical form, dealing with topics relating to time, tempo, different notions of time, and approaches to time are welcome. More information about the open call of the Main Exhibition can be found here. Works can be submitted digitally via Defolio.

Tallinn Applied Art Triennial is an international art event established in 1979. The goal of the Triennial is to offer new, topical and unexpected focus, which will serve to help examine contemporary applied art and design practices on as broad scale as possible. Every Triennial has new format and theme, but it has always been centered around the main exhibition with additional events and happenings supporting and explaining its main topic.

The triennial is organized by NGO Tallinn Applied Art Triennial Society.

Press contact:

Merle Kasonen
Chairwoman
Tallinn Applied Art Triennial Society
merle@trtr.ee
+372 528 1637

Anu Almik